Google Instant=SEO Death/Double Rainbow~What does it mean?

I always laugh when something new is released or changed and it’s immediately hailed on the interwebs as a “game changer” or the “death” of something. Everyone rushes to say something provocative fast. I’ve done it in the past via Twitter so guilty as charged. It’s sooo easy (I instant harshed on iPads and Flipboard). 

Yesterday when Google Instant was launched I was kinda shocked to see Steve Rubel tweet

and

BOLD. INSTANT. PROVOCATIVE. STATEMENT. Check.

Click here to read Google’s announcement. 

Steve’s POV is that "no two people will see the same web…The reason this is a game changer is feedback. When you get feedback, you change your behaviors…Google Instant means no one will see the same web anymore, making optimizing it virtually impossible. Real-time feedback will change and personalize people’s search behaviors."

Just to be clear - I have a great deal of respect for Steve Rubel of Edelman. He’s an interesting thought leader on all things digital. I’ve followed him and his writings for a long time. I appreciate his POV. I continue to do so and think that anyone who dismisses him is flat out nuts. 

In this instance, I think Steve jumped on the “Google Instant is going to kill SEO” express just a bit too soon and here’s why. 

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09.09.10
I likey GoogleTV! Hmmm…wonder who squirms the most - AppleTV, Boxee, etc.
sectionfive:

 
Google Unveils Google TV Website
Looks pretty good.
(via)

I likey GoogleTV! Hmmm…wonder who squirms the most - AppleTV, Boxee, etc.

sectionfive:

Google Unveils Google TV Website

Looks pretty good.

(via)

(via tanya77)

04.10.10
There’s too much stuff. It seems to me that almost all tools we rely on to manage information weren’t designed for a world of infinite info. They were designed as if you could consume whatever was out there that you were interested in.

Evan Williams: The Challenges of a Web of Infinite Info: Tech News and Analysis «

Completely agree. This is a huge opportunity for entrepreneurs to figure out. 

(via bijan)

And this is why I think the Tumblr community is so valuable. You guys go out there and find all the stuff you think is worth someone reading. After that, all I need to do is go out and find you.

(via caterpillarcowboy)

This deja vu completely floored me. This is the EXACT same discussion that went on pre-Google in the 90s. Yes there were other search engine’s but Google took it to a completely new level. I expect a truly social relevance search tool will emerge…or is it Facebook and @Ev doesn’t want to admit that? 

(via joshsternberg)

30.12.10
The NYT page is like walking into a library, while the HuffPo page is like walking through Times Square.

Felix Salmon weighing in on the HuffPost-AOL merger deal in his piece, “Why the NYT will lose to HuffPo.”  

Fellow member ‘20’ member Anthony DeRosa says he’s not sure if he agrees.

My take: The driving force behind HuffPo’s success is the comments and feedback from readers, who send it along and add their own voices and thoughts on the topic. Although the Times site allows comments, it’s not as open or available.  Despite being run and named after an extremely rich female, HuffPo is the true populist news site —and the reason why, I agree with Salmon, it will topple the Old Gray Lady.  

-KH 

(via the20newyork)

I’m not sure I represent the majority of people since I never go to Huffington Post, despite the fact they’re one of the most frequently trafficked websites on the Internet.

I think the above comment by Felix is spot on, and is exactly why I avoid HuffPo like the plague. I work in Times Square and try to escape from it as quickly as possible. I do agree with Felix’s point that I don’t navigate around the NYT. I go there because I’m directed to single articles. I read the article and leave and wind up coming back many more times to read other single articles, but never seem to be led down a path from one story to another by the Times itself. 

But does the sensory overkill on HuffPo work? The numbers speak for themselves. They get a ton of traffic and they’re profitable. Peter Feld defended the fact that people slam HuffPo for having 3,000+ unpaid bloggers. According to what I’ve heard, the paid staff is somewhere around 60 people.

Peter does make a solid point that we here on Tumblr are very much like that staff of 3,000 unpaid bloggers. When’s the last time Tumblr sent you a check for the billions of pageviews they received last month?

(via soupsoup)


I’m fascinated with how “traditional” media industries - newspaper/magazine/publishing, music, TV/movies, web 1.0 (AOL, MSN, Yahoo!, Google) - are thinking about and REACTING TO the emergence of social media integrated apps, games, business, sites, etc. like The Huffington Post, Zynga games, Tumblr, etc.

It’s still strikes me as we approach nearly 20 years of digital that the media companies usual reactions follows a cyclical pattern of disfunction:

1. Dismissal,

2. Ignoring early signs of success,

3. Looking for & latching onto the “me too” silver bullet gadget/retread business model,

4. Taking a half/wrong steps (e.g. DRM, paywalls, magazine/newspaper iPad apps), 

5. Continuing their methodical death march towards obsolescence hoping their half/wrong steps will work,

6. Going back to step 1 when the next digital innovation occurs.

Influential VC’s and tumblr users Fred-Wilson and Bijan Sabet had interesting posts about music/movie piracy and their frustration at trying to buy content and not being able to because of backasswards attitude/ineptitude of traditional media companies. 

Here’s the deal - while there will always be a market for purchased entertainment and information (Broadway/West End theatre, physical/digital music copies, print/digital information), they will all increasingly become smaller and more niche industries. 

The challenge that has been obvious for well over a decade now: How should media companies best proactively plan, change, and innovate for inevitable massively disruptive technology advances? I’m talking about fundamental repositioning of their value proposition, what they do, how many people they employ, their revenue expectations, HOW CONTENT DEVELOPMENT IS FINANCED, and most importantly, how they create new valuable business models that are not retreads of what worked in the past while realizing that they may not be as BIG as record vinyl discs were in the 70s-80s or CDs in the 90s. All that’s over. 

Unfortunately, my up close experience and work within these industries has shown me that the delusional cycle continues…and continues.

Meanwhile the most innovative thoughts/leadership comes from smart musicians likeDavid Byrne and Radiohead’s Thom Yorke…or bloggers like Anthony De Rosa (SoupSoup).

Hmmmmm…

(Source: nbcnewyork, via soupsoup)

09.02.11

Facebook lost half its value today.

Google Buzz 1.0 is a better product than the seven-year old Facebook. Look at Scoble’s post from TED… he never left GMAIL and he instantly has tons of comments… and they are more intelligent than the ones on Facebook.

Facebook has stolen everyone’s ideas for six years and today they just got a taste of their own medicine. Google has ripped off their interface and done it 10x better.

Game over… Facebook is the new MySpace.

Jason Calacanis on 2/10/10 (via soupsoup)

Every dog has its day…and then it ends. That’s just the way it works.

28.02.11
#YES
via minusmanhattan:

Murakami for Google today for the summer solstice.

#YES

via minusmanhattan:

Murakami for Google today for the summer solstice.

21.06.11
Google working on a marketplace for advertisers to buy and sell your data
11.07.11
So #Brooklyn will be about 6-10 miles from the center (storm cone) of Hurricane Irene according to Google’s 2011 Hurricane Season app. Ummm…fuck.

So #Brooklyn will be about 6-10 miles from the center (storm cone) of Hurricane Irene according to Google’s 2011 Hurricane Season app. Ummm…fuck.

27.08.11

Another Fun Data Point

parislemon:

When Apple’s market cap hits $400 billion, they’ll be worth more than Microsoft and Google — combined

They’re now less than $20 billion away from that happening. 

More signs of le #stock #bubble.

Q: What happens to Apple’s market cap when the double dip recession gets worse & consumers opt for cheaper smart phones/tablets or hang on to what they have?

Another stock market bubble bursting or correction will be ugly for Google, Microsoft, and Apple. Long-term #MSFT is in the weakest position given it’s enterprise & consumers products in addition to a thin software/product pipeline. After that, #APPL has a lot of cash on hand but a consumer electronics company in a long-term recessionary environment scares me. And #GOOG is well Google. They’ve got cash, smart people, and lots of irons in the fire. Google is search, email, search advertising, some social/productivity missteps, etc. Push comes to shove long-term, I’d think they’re in the best position.

19.09.11
via zeb:

The Facebook Chart That Freaks Google Out - (time users spend on site)
“The overhaul Facebook rolled out last week is meant, first and foremost, to keep users sticking around. But, hyperbole aside, Facebook is already crushing the rest of the Web when it comes to stickiness.
Check out this engagement chart, courtesy of Citigroup’s Mark Mahaney. It’s a neat illustration of the Web 2.0 era, and does a nice job of explaining why Google is so freaked out about Facebook, and why AOL and Yahoo seem to be in eternal turnaround mode. (Note that just a couple of years ago, someone might have thought to include Myspace in here. Remember?)”
via http://allthingsd.com/20110926/the-facebook-chart-that-freaks-google-out/

I’ve seen similar charts before and they all bear out the Facebook’s mass 2.0 appeal. 

via zeb:

The Facebook Chart That Freaks Google Out - (time users spend on site)

“The overhaul Facebook rolled out last week is meant, first and foremost, to keep users sticking around. But, hyperbole aside, Facebook is already crushing the rest of the Web when it comes to stickiness.

Check out this engagement chart, courtesy of Citigroup’s Mark Mahaney. It’s a neat illustration of the Web 2.0 era, and does a nice job of explaining why Google is so freaked out about Facebook, and why AOL and Yahoo seem to be in eternal turnaround mode. (Note that just a couple of years ago, someone might have thought to include Myspace in here. Remember?)”

via http://allthingsd.com/20110926/the-facebook-chart-that-freaks-google-out/

I’ve seen similar charts before and they all bear out the Facebook’s mass 2.0 appeal. 

03.10.11
via zeb:

Think Quarterly by Google’s latest: The Speed Issue

via zeb:

Think Quarterly by Google’s latest: The Speed Issue

10.01.12

Conducting informal poll: Twitter vs Google

via joshsternberg:

If you had one to give up, which would it be: Google (and all that comes with Google) or Twitter?

So far, on Twitter, I’ve gotten 10 responses: 4 would give up Google, 4 would give up Twitter, 1 said it was a false choice and refused to play in my reindeer games, and 1 said it was a stupid question.

What say you?

I would hold on to Google hands down.

Twitter is less useful for me than tumblr and other social tools I use (and I was an early-ish Twitter adopter and have preferred it over the Facebook). I still post to Twitter but I use Tumblr or instagram or Path (which I’m still trying to understand it’s value proposition). Twitter is no longer the first thing I check in the morning. Sometimes, I check Twitter AFTER I CHECK EMAIL. Yes I still use email. I’ll use and check Twitter during live events or breaking news, but Tumblr has replaced Twitter as my “go to” live event newsfeed (@producematthew, @joshsternberg, @shortformblog, @soupsoup, @katetopolis) as it provides more context and saves me clicks. As a major #cycling enthusiast, my Tumblr content is starting to rival my Twitter cycling list (which is huge and comprehensive) in terms of personal relevance. 

And at least Google is trying to innovate. When was the last time Twitter did something REALLY INNOVATIVE besides moving pixels around? Where is Twitter’s “Gmail” or “Google Docs” or “AdWords” or “AdSense”??? Google’s products might not always work (Wave, etc.) but the search innovator gets major kudos for trying.  

There’s no question, Google, and everything that comes with it, dwarfs the value of Twitter…which I still really like.  

What say you? Let @joshsternberg know! 

UPDATE: Annnnnnd I forgot Chrome, the FREE browser which this post was written on and which I use almost exclusively. 

(Source: joshsternberg)

11.01.12