Interesting video via @tim_nolan

What’s striking is that Karsten’s ideas are probably perceived as “cutting-edge thought leadership” in the agency world. In fact, I heard many of the same points in the mid-oughts from agency-world “thought-leaders.”

In the past five years the world has completely changed two or three times over (2.0, social media, gaming, mobile), and it continues change at a RAPID pace. However, agency world decision makers AND THE AGENCY BUSINESS MODEL have not changed. 

Why is the agency world still trying to come to grips with “digital” and what it means in 2010 and beyond? The industry is stuck in an information-decision making loop where they know the business landscape is continually changing, they mime all the right buzz words and theories, but when push comes to shove they can’t commit to or foster real change. 

Why? It’s partly generational. It’s partly knowledge. It’s partly experience.  

For instance, because ad industry decision makers aren’t digital entrepreneurs, they can’t embrace change. Pivoting business models, products, creative campaigns via testing/refining/optimization, production models, etc., in mid-stream is second nature to digital entrepreneurs. Collaboration that involves everyone is a simple strategy for success. Why wouldn’t you involve a developer or the lowly PA in a strategy session? Great, creative ideas can come from anyone and everyone. I’ve seen it happen time and time again. 

Smart, smaller start-up agencies are doing it. 

For digital start-ups though, all of this isn’t “thought-leading.” It’s just part of our digital DNA. Either you get it, or you don’t. The most interesting people I like to work with understand/are skilled in design, marketing, social media, strategy, P/L, production management, AND development. However, all of this comes second nature to us and that’s why we’re entrepreneurs.

21.11.10
The M.O. of the New Entrepreneur is to start small, launch fast, listen to your early and devoted clientele, and, if necessary, tear up your business plan.

Choire Sicha in a story about new entrepeneurs in Details.

Sicha calls this the antidote to the too big to fail mentality. It’s not only startups that should be learning from their failures, but the bigger companies (ie publishers), too.

[found via Langer]

(via jaketbrooks)

Accurate.

(via capitalnewyork)

(Source: jaketbrooks, via capitalnewyork)

26.01.11
Information Arbitrage: Winning the talent war
15.12.11
Information Arbitrage: Letting go
08.01.12

This is so on target…

via zeb:

Excellent, super worthwhile deck on becoming an entrepreneur and sticking it out in startupland. “The 10 Mistakes I’ve Made” by Tara Hunt @missrogue

06.02.12
An excellent #MustRead behind-the-scene’s profile of @instagram’s growth, strategic single-minded determination to scale with user growth. #latency
via laughingsquid:

Inside Instagram: How Slowing Its Roll Put the Little Startup in the Fast Lane

An excellent #MustRead behind-the-scene’s profile of @instagram’s growth, strategic single-minded determination to scale with user growth. #latency

via laughingsquid:

Inside Instagram: How Slowing Its Roll Put the Little Startup in the Fast Lane

07.02.12
The most important thing in all start-ups are the people. Get the right team, with the big brains and skill sets…on the line roles. Then unleash their power on the business’ vision in a collaborative and creative environment and execute. 
via bijan:

Rare to see founders share this view of the world. I remember the day @jack showed it to the Twitter board. Healthy and important perspective. 
via fred-wilson:

Joel Spolsky’s org chart from this guest post he did for me today. I love the marketing organization!

The most important thing in all start-ups are the people. Get the right team, with the big brains and skill sets…on the line roles. Then unleash their power on the business’ vision in a collaborative and creative environment and execute. 

via bijan:

Rare to see founders share this view of the world. I remember the day @jack showed it to the Twitter board. Healthy and important perspective. 

via fred-wilson:

Joel Spolsky’s org chart from this guest post he did for me today. I love the marketing organization!

13.02.12
Today even my luvly wife who doesn’t use Instagram exclaimed, “Oh NO!” when I told her the $1 Billion Instagram The Facebook acquisition news. 
Om Malik captures perfectly why Zuckerberg threw down the money - Passion & Emotion & Users = #FEAR.
The Business Insider via @TechSailor captures the blow by blow of how it went down - INSANELY FAST: “Facebook ‘Flipped Out’ After Instagram Recently Raised $50 Million”
That. Was. Last. Week.
Like everyone I was shocked. Then sad (I really wanted Instagram to grow and be an alternative social network built around some of my passions). Then happy for the Instagram team. They built it and cashed in within two years. That’s an insane business ride. #Bubble
Om Malik:

"My translation: Facebook was scared shitless and knew that for first time in its life it arguably had a competitor that could not only eat its lunch, but also destroy its future prospects. Why? Because Facebook is essentially about photos, and Instagram had found and attacked Facebook’s achilles heel — mobile photo sharing.
 Instagram has what Facebook craves – passionate community. People like Facebook. People use Facebook. People love Instagram. It is my single most-used app. I spend an hour a day on Instagram. I have made friends based on photos they share. I know how they feel, and how they see the world. Facebook lacks soul. Instagram is all soul and emotion.”

via soupsoup:
Here is why Facebook bought Instagram

Today even my luvly wife who doesn’t use Instagram exclaimed, “Oh NO!” when I told her the $1 Billion Instagram The Facebook acquisition news. 

Om Malik captures perfectly why Zuckerberg threw down the money - Passion & Emotion & Users = #FEAR.

The Business Insider via @TechSailor captures the blow by blow of how it went down - INSANELY FAST: “Facebook ‘Flipped Out’ After Instagram Recently Raised $50 Million”

That. Was. Last. Week.

Like everyone I was shocked. Then sad (I really wanted Instagram to grow and be an alternative social network built around some of my passions). Then happy for the Instagram team. They built it and cashed in within two years. That’s an insane business ride. #Bubble

Om Malik:

"My translation: Facebook was scared shitless and knew that for first time in its life it arguably had a competitor that could not only eat its lunch, but also destroy its future prospects. Why? Because Facebook is essentially about photos, and Instagram had found and attacked Facebook’s achilles heel — mobile photo sharing.

 Instagram has what Facebook craves – passionate community. People like Facebook. People use Facebook. People love Instagram. It is my single most-used app. I spend an hour a day on Instagram. I have made friends based on photos they share. I know how they feel, and how they see the world. Facebook lacks soul. Instagram is all soul and emotion.

via soupsoup:

Here is why Facebook bought Instagram

09.04.12
Friday Nite @ #ChiconCollective #ATX #Startups ~ #Creativity #Entrepreneurs #YoungGuns #Developers #rails #android (Taken with Instagram at Chicon Collective)

Friday Nite @ #ChiconCollective #ATX #Startups ~ #Creativity #Entrepreneurs #YoungGuns #Developers #rails #android (Taken with Instagram at Chicon Collective)

17.08.12